logl・ログル

世界をログしよう!

【英日併記】2017.12.15英BBC #伊藤詩織さん インタビュー "Japan's #MeToo Moment"

T. Katsumi
2017.12.21

2017年12月15日、英BBCが 『日本の #MeToo モーメント』と題して昏睡レイプの被害を訴え現在東京地裁で係争中のジャーナリスト #伊藤詩織さん にラジオインタビューを行った。刑事事件としては不起訴が確定したデートレイプ事件に直面した詩織さんが6分間のインタビューの中で語ったのは次の内容だった。

参照動画:http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p05r58zm

Although speaking out about abuse and rape is difficult in almost all circumstances, women living in certain countries face insurmountable obstacles when seeking justice. Japan is one of those places. Entrenched cultural norms which don't even allow the word rape to be mentioned, have silenced women almost entirely. But one person refused to be quiet - journalist Shiori Ito. The man in question has publicly denied all allegations.

ほとんどの状況において、性暴力やレイプについて公に語ることは難しいとされている。しかし一部の国では、正義を訴えようとする女性が乗り越え難い障害に直面する。日本はそうした国の一つだ。日本では、『レイプ』という言葉を発することすら憚れるような根深い文化的規範を背景に、ほとんどの女性が沈黙を強いられている。そんな中で沈黙を拒む一人の女性がいる。ジャーナリストの伊藤詩織さんだ。問題の男は公然と容疑を否認している。


Shiroi Ito, Journalist

ジャーナリスト・伊藤詩織さん

I was raped two years ago in 2015. And the man who raped me, he offered me a job in Washington DC, because he was bureau chief in one of the Japanese mainstream TV news station. We made appointment to meet because we need to talk about working visa.

二年前の2015年、私はレイプされました。私を襲った男は日本の大手テレビニュース局の支局長だったので、ワシントンDCで働ける仕事を私に紹介してくれるという話でした。労働ビザについて話し合う必要があっため、互いに都合をつけて会う約束をしたのです。

It was hard to realize that someone you trust or someone you respect would do that. So I was scared, because he was quite close to all the high-profile politicians. So it took time, to me, to think if this is the right thing to do, if anyone would believe me. 

自分が尊敬する人、信頼する人がそういうことをしたのだと気付くのは辛いことでした。彼は大物政治家に近い人物だったので、怖くなりました。だからこれ[訴えること]が正しいことなのか、信じて貰うことができるのか、考えるのに時間がかかりました。

I decided, okay I'm going to the police, and I knew that this would make me hard to work in ... work as a journalist in Japan to accuse such a high-profile journalist. And then when I got to the right person to talk to, he told me, "These things happen a lot, and we can't investigate. It would never be prosecuted, it would never be charged, and it's just a waste of time."

「警察に行こう」と決めましたが、そのような著名なジャーナリストを日本で訴えたら仕事をするのが…ジャーナリストとして仕事をするのが難しくなることは覚悟の上でした。そして、然るべき人物に伝えると、彼はこう言いました。

「こういうことはよくあるんです。捜査はできません。訴追はされないし、立件もされないでしょう。時間の無駄でしかありません」

But I told him, "Look, I know which hotel I came out from. They must have security camera. Can you at least check that ?"

でも私はこう言いました。

「どのホテルから出てきたかは覚えています。防犯カメラがありますよね。せめてそれを確認していただけませんか?」

So he did a few days after, and we saw that this man was pulling me out from the taxi. So this investigator said, "Okay, this is something." 

数日後、彼はそうしてくれました。そして私をタクシーから引きずり出している男の姿を見て、その捜査官が「これならいけるかもしれない」と言ったんです。

So I thought he would accept, that he would file the case. And then he told me, "Look, you're accusing such a high-profile journalist. You have no chance to be a journalist in Japan. "

私はこれで彼が事件を認め、捜査を開始してくれるだろうと思ったんです。でも彼は私にこう言いました。
「あなたは著名なジャーナリストを訴えようとしています。日本でジャーナリストとして活動できなくなりますよ」

-- That's what the investigator or detective said to you?

―それは、捜査官が言ったのですか?それとも刑事が?

The investigator.

捜査官です。
-- And how did that make you feel?
―そう言われて、どのように感じましたか?

It was quite a tough decision to make, although I had to do it. Because if I put a lid on the truth that I have, I shouldn't be a journalist. And also, I started having more questions, why can't you investigate?

難しい決断でした。でも、私がやるしかありませんでした。私の知る真実に蓋をしてしまえば、私はジャーナリストではいられなくなるからです。それから、次々に疑問が芽生え始めていました。なぜ捜査できないのかと。

Finally, one day they called me. The investigator decided to file the case. The court issued arrest warrant two months after that.

そして遂にある日、電話がかかってきました。捜査を開始することを決めたと。
裁判所はその二か月後に逮捕状の発行を認めました。

And during the investigation, it was hard... Every time investigator has changed, they asked me if I was a virgin. Why would you ask these questions so many times? I stopped going for work. Every time I see the same... similar figure man on a street, I became panicked. So I decided,"Okay, maybe it's better for me to go outside of Japan."

捜査の過程では、大変な思いをしました。捜査官が変わるたびに、私が処女かどうかを確認されました。なぜこのような質問を何度もされなければならないのか。私は仕事に行くのをやめました。あの男と同じ…似た背格好の男性をみると、パニックを起こしていました。そこで私は、「よし、日本の外に出てみよう」と決めました。

-- So just to go back, so he was still in the United States but there was an arrest warrant issued for him WHILE he was still in the United States. Is that right?

―ちょっと話を戻しますが、つまり彼はまだ米国にいて、彼が米国にいる間に逮捕状が発行されたということですね?これで正しいですか?

Yes.

そうです。

-- So how did that go, then? What happened there?

ーそれからどうなったのでしょうか。何が起きたのでしょうか。

Investigators plan was to wait at the Narita Airport and arrest him as soon as he gets on land. But then the investigator called me on the day they were going to arrest, and he said, "There was order from above," and they stopped the arrest. 

捜査官は、成田に彼が到着したらすぐに彼を逮捕する予定でいました。でも、その捜査官は彼を逮捕する予定のその当日に電話をかけてきてこう言ったんです。

「上からの指示」があって、逮捕を取りやめたと。

It was shocking, because if once the court issues an arrest, investigator can change it? But they did. So I asked why and how. He couldn't tell me.

とてもショックを受けました。裁判所が逮捕状を発行したのに、捜査官がこれを変えられる?でも、それが実際に起きたのです。だから私は彼になぜ、どのようにしてこうなったのかを訪ねましたが、彼は答えられませんでした。

He said, "This is just so odd and rare."

ただ、「これはひじょうに奇妙で希なことです」と言うだけでした。

-- Am I right in saying that you are the first person who has publicly said, openly under her own name, "I was raped. This is my story," in this country?

―あなたはこの国で初めて、公然と、自分の名前を出して、「私はレイプされた。これが私が経験したことです」と語った人であると考えていいのでしょうか?

I'm the first person who spoke out about rape by someone familiar.

顔なじみの人にレイプされたことを訴えた初めての人ではあります。

-- What have you learned about your own country from your experience? What have you heard from other people since you've spoken out?

ーこの経験からあなたが自分の国について学んだことは何でしょうか。声を上げてから他の人からはどんなことを言われましたか?

I was quite disappointed. I felt like everyone knew about me. So I couldn't go out anymore. So I was always ... I had to disguise myself if I needed to go somewhere. And I started seeing these websites talking about my personal life, my family. I saw my family's photo. So I was scared if I go out with my family, with my friend, what's going to happen to them? I couldn't leave the house.

ひじょうに落胆しました。誰もが私のことを知っているような気がして、外に出ることができなくなりました。だから私は常に…どこかに行くときは変装して出かけていました。そしたら、私の個人的なことや家族について語り合うサイトが現れて、そこには家族の写真もあったんです。ですから家族や友人とどこに行くのも怖くなりました。彼らに何が起こるかを考えると恐ろしかったからです。家をまったく出れなくなりました。

I decided to quit to media I was working for, and be a freelancer and start working with British media. I had a chance to move to UK this summer and that made me feel, again, like a person; that I can go out.

働いていたメディアの仕事を辞め、フリーランスとなってイギリスのメディアに協力するようになりました。この夏にはイギリスに引っ越すことができ、また普通の、いち個人に戻れた気がしました。自由に出歩けるようになったと。

-- Well, we are sitting here in Tokyo. How do you feel about Japan and being in Tokyo now? Do you feel any change at all?

―いま私たちはこうして東京にいるわけですが、日本についてどう思っていますか?そしていま東京にいることについても。何か変化を感じていますか?

Finally I do feel small small changes. Politicians are now talking about it at the Diet, at the parliament, and they finally changed the rape law which hasn't changed for a 110 years. 

小さな、とても小さな変化が起きているという気はしています。政治家は国会―議会―で議論するようになったし、110年間も変わることのなかったレイプに関する法律が遂に改正されました。

As a journalist I tried many different ways to talk about it through media, but none of these worked. So in the end, I had to be the ONE who speak out about it. And certainly, sexual violence could happen anywhere anytime in the world.

ジャーナリストとして、メディアを介したさまざまな手段で訴えようとしましたが、どれもうまくいきませんでした。なので結局、最終的には、私自身が声を上げるしかないと思うようになりました。性暴力はいつどこでも起こり得ることなのですから。

But I was more shocked by what had happened afterwards, that made me really hopeless. And I never realized what kind of society that I was living in. Okay, legal system -- it would take time. But social system can change to support and help. And that would make a major change for survivors to take the next step. Now, I do see some positive movements, so I'm very optimistic.

でも私がもっと衝撃を受けたのは、その後に起きたことでした。絶望の淵に立たされました。自分がどんな社会に住んでいるのかを私はわかっていなかったのです。司法のシステムは、時間がかかっても仕方がないのかもしれません。でも社会のシステムは、支え合い、手を差し伸べる方向に変えることができます。それは性暴力を生き延びたサバイバーたちにとって、次のステップを踏むための大きな変化をもたらすはずです。いまは、目に見えるポジティブな動きも起きているので、私はひじょうに楽観的にみています。

人気ログランキング

最新ログ

もっと見る
TOPへ戻る